Atlanta Jazz Festival 2011

The great musical weekend

Co-written by: Anita Ware Johnson

One of the joys for music lovers is the great outdoors,  accompanied by live music entertainment.  The combined experience stimulates many senses.   Outdoor shows will include cultural affects such as  fine art works, clothing and an assortment of food and beverage.

Planning; regardless of the stature of the performers,  requires careful detail and within this structure you will find the recipes for success or failure for every outdoor show.  Any shortfall in pedestrian accessibility will manifest itself to disappoint the attendees.

I’ve enjoyed outdoor concerts from many points of view: promoter, fan, performer and as an organizer to name a few.  Comparing notes and combining these experiences has empowered me to bring pedestrian accessibility to the forefront of event planning.

There is a duality of responsibility for the outdoor, concert attendees and the concert organizers.  My hopes in posting a pedestrian accessibility blog series are tied to the perpetuation of this great medium, upgrading the infrastructure that surrounds an enjoyable event.

The scope of the planners has to encompass a broad and detailed walking plan.  Our pedestrian accessibility assessment and action plan would contain a schematics diagram, titled mPed.

mPed raises the bar of expectation for concerts and events.   Our plan is a blueprint for people moving.  We maximize strategy for safety and enjoyment through efficient people moving.  Our mPed Mycyber map includes schematics for performers,  vendors,  attendees and the surrounding residential and business communities.

Think about your own outdoor concert history. What was enjoyable? What was not so enjoyable?  Our informal polling ties a good experience into pedestrian accessibility.  In our 5-part blog series,  we will cover improving people movement in outdoor concerts.

This is the beginning!  The thought and promotion to logistically improve an outdoor concert works to the best for everyone’s benefit. Outdoor concerts are built for fun;  start planning to attend a local or national event.

I’m looking forward to the 34th Annual Atlanta Georgia Jazz Festival.

Next, we will focus on the plans we all make when deciding to attend an outdoor event.  Concert goers — Let’s keep it moving and raise the accountability for Pedestrian Accessibility.

Contact John G. Dewberry at 404-328-0708 or mycybermap@gmail.com for Pedestrian Accessibility for your event.

©2011 All Rights Reserved – To reproduce this document obtain written permission from John G. Dewberry

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